HR METRICS AND ANALYTICS: When Facts and Numbers Matter... Even in HR | HRのメトリクス(指標)とアナリティクス(分析): 事実

Originally written in English

This article first published at The HR Agenda Magazine [November 2016-February 2017 issue].

Are you suffering from the “Trump Syndrome”? Here's how data can save HR from this costly affliction.

For the past 15 months, the world has been a silent observer of probably the most consequential elections in U.S. presidential race. And we did so with great anxiety, concern, and yes, even fanfare especially when Republican candidate Donald J. Trump takes the stage and starts talking. His speeches have largely been discredited by fact checkers as baseless, distorted and contradictory. His statements have been called out for being downright myths, lies and figments of his own imagination. Collectively, I call these the “Trump syndrome” which is really just a simple term for the tendency of a person to speak or make judgements without the benefit of facts, numbers, logic, reasoning or science.

Unfortunately, many people think HR also suffers from the Trump syndrome.

As an example, as many of you know, I teach a required MBA course on human resources management (HRM) at GLOBIS University, Japan’s largest MBA school. At the start of the course, I ask the students what’s the first thing that comes into their minds when they hear the term “HR.” I get the same sets of answers every time: recruiting, employee relations, compensation, benefits, performance management, training and development, employee engagement, and so on.

Now when you ask the same question but this time change HR to “accounting,” “finance,” or even “marketing,” most often than not you’ll get answers around financial ratios, debits and credits, accounts payables and receivables, market shares, market penetration rates, customer satisfaction rates, etc.

So what’s the difference? HR is readily more associated with the qualitative tasks and accounting, finance or marketing with the quantitative tasks. That is, HR seems to suffer from a perception problem, one that stereotypes the profession as only capable of doing the “soft” or “touchy” part of the business. Bluntly speaking, most people think that HR can’t speak numbers — arguably the basic language of business.

How did this happen?

For a long time and until now, HR has never been a recognized profession especially in Japan. In fact, not one school in Japan offers an undergraduate degree in HRM. If HR is taught, it is most likely one of the subjects in another course like MBA, or as part of a continuing education program.

For most HR professionals in Japan, they landed in HR because of job rotation. Some went to HR purely by accident or by chance while others ended up in HR because HR was the last place that they can be placed at, i.e., a dumping ground for an organization’s “basket of unplaceables.” (Suggested Reading: Why Are You in HR?: A Hint -- It Shouldn’t be Just About the People, The HR Agenda Magazine, Oct-Dec 2013 issue)

In the absence of the rigor and academic discipline that goes with a formal study of HRM in a school or university, HR has unfortunately floundered to do its job based on gut feelings, hunches, “human relationship,” established policies and procedures, “best practices,” and politicking and policing. In my more than 25 years of HR experience and meetings with hundreds of HR professionals, I know very few HR professionals who make their decisions based on a mix of “soft” and “hard” data such as HR metrics and analytics. In fact, I haven’t heard of an HR professional being called a “geek” or a “nerd” much like engineers or programmers are most likely to be called as such.

Why facts and numbers matter... even in HR

Simple answer: Because what you can measure, you can improve. In addition, the use of facts and numbers help us to be more objective. If the data and facts are collected in a scientific manner, it adds more credibility to the decision-making process so that business can make informed decisions.

As steward of an organization’s most important asset, its people, HR professionals are in a unique and opportune position to influence and shape performance by using people metrics and analytics. If you are in recruiting, metrics like cost-per-hire, quality of hire, and time-to-hire are just some of the numbers that you need to know to formulate an effective talent acquisition strategy.

If you are in training and development, the RoT (return-on-training) and Training Effectiveness (TE) of your training programs would probably top the list of the key indicators that you need to know and use to maximize your investment in people.

Similarly, if you are doing compensation and benefits, the knowledge on which percentile your organization is paying versus the market (i.e., below, at par, or above the market) will help your organization attract and retain talent.

This may come as a surprise for many HR professionals but in reality, there are numerous metrics and analytics that HR can use to measure and shape the performance of people and the organization. That is, HR can also be ruled by numbers. In this issue of The HR Agenda, we provide some of the most important and useful concepts according to the experts in this field. We are truly grateful for their contributions in helping transform HR from an art to a science, which is really the first step in elevating HR to a recognized profession inside and outside of Japan.

Facts and numbers matter even in HR because when HR bases its decisions on facts and numbers and not just on feelings, broken assumptions or even cultural inertia, HR can make better people decisions which truly matters in business because after all, as Jack Welch once said, “Business is about people.”

英語原文からの翻訳

​​ トランプ・シンドローム”にあなたは罹っていないか? データはこうして高価な痛手からHRを救うことができる。

過去15か月間、大きな不安と懸念を持って、世界はアメリカ大統領選の間接選挙を注視してきた。特に共和党候補ドナルド・トランプ氏がステージに上がり語り始めたときのファンファーレを見てきた。彼のスピーチのほとんどは根拠がなく、曲解であり、自己矛盾だと、専門家によってその信頼性が否定されている。彼の発言は、彼の想像から出た、紛れもない神話、嘘、作り話だと断じられている。私はこれらをまとめて”トランプ・シンドローム”と呼んでいる。それは事実、数字、論理、理性、科学なしに語り、判断を下す人の傾向を端的に指す言葉である。

 HRもトランプ・シンドロームに罹っていると考えている人が多いことは残念なことだ。

 一例であるが、皆さんの多くが知っているように、私は日本最大の経営学修士(MBA)の学校であるグロービス経営大学院で人材管理(HRM)に関するMBAの必修コースを教えている。コースの初めに私は学生に、”HR”と聞いて、何が思い浮かぶかを尋ねるようにしている。答えは毎回同じようなものだ。すなわち、採用、従業員関係、報酬、福利、パフォーマンス管理、訓練、開発、従業員エンゲージメントなどである。

同じ質問を、HRに換えて、”経理”、”財部”、さらには“マーケティング”ですると、たいていは財務比率、借方と貸方、買掛金勘定と売掛金勘定、市場占有率、市場浸透度、顧客満足度などの答えが返ってくる。

違いは何か? HRはすぐに質に結び付けられるのに対して、経理、財務、マーケティングは量に結び付けられるということだ。つまり、HRはビジネスのソフト部分、気難しい部分をするだけの能力がある専門職であるという固定観念で見られているという認知上の問題に悩まされているということだ。はっきり言って、HRにはビジネスの基本言語である数字を語る能力がないと考えている人が多いのだ。

どうしてこんなことが起こったのか?

 だいぶん前から現在に至るまで、日本でHRは専門職として認知されたことはなかった。実のところ、日本には人材管理の学士コースを提供している学校が1校もない。HRが教えられている場合でもそれはMBAといった他のコースの科目の1つか、連続教育プログラムの一部として教えられているに過ぎない。

日本のたいていのHR従事者にとってHRは人事配置で就いた職に過ぎなかったりする。またある人たちにとってはHRに来たのはたまたまだったり、最後の行き場、すなわち、企業内で他に行き場のない者たちの溜まり場だから来たりしたというのだ(本誌2013年10-12月号「あなたがHRの世界にいる“理由” ヒント—HRの仕事は人間だけが相手ではない」参照のこと)

厳密さがなく、学校・大学で正式に人材管理を教える学問分野もないなか、HRは不幸にも、直感、予感、”人間関係”、出来上がった方針と手続き、政治活動と警察活動をすることでどうにか自己の仕事をこなしているのだ。私が25年以上HRを経験し何百人のHRプロに会ってきたなかで、ソフトデータとHRの指標と分析といったハードデータを組み合わせて判断を下すHRプロにほとんど出会ったことがない。エンジニアやプログラマーでよく聞かれる“おたく”、”専門バカ”と呼ばれている人をHRプロでは1人も聞いたことがない。

事実と数字はなぜ重要なのか…HRでさえ

答えは簡単:計測できるものは、改善できるからだ。加えて、事実と数字を使うことで私たちはより客観的になることができるのだ。データと事実が科学的方法で収集されれば意思決定過程は信頼性を増し、ビジネスは情報に基づいた決定ができるようになる。

企業の最も重要な資本である人材の管財人として、HRプロは、HRの指標と分析を駆使することで、パフォーマンスに影響を与え形作ることができる比類で好都合な立場にいるのだ。採用を担当しているなら、採用者1人当たりのコスト、採用者の質、採用所要時間は、効果的な人材獲得戦略を策定するために必要な数字の例と言えるだろう。

訓練と開発を担当しているなら、訓練プログラムの訓練収益率、訓練有効性が、あなたが知るべき、また人への投資を最大化するために使うべき、主要指標リストのトップに来るものだろう。

同様に、報酬と福利を担当しているなら、一般平均に対してあなたの企業がどれほどの報酬を払っているか(市場より低いのか、同じほどか、高いのか)を知ることは人材を引き付け、引き留めるうえで役に立つことだろう。

HRプロにとっては驚きかも知れないが、実のところ、人と企業のパフォーマンスを計測し、形作るためにHRが利用できる指標と分析がたくさんある。すなわち、HRも数によって管理することができるのだ。「The HR Agenda」本号において、この分野の専門家たちが最も重要で役に立つ概念のいくつかを提供している。HRを技から科学へと換えることに貢献している彼らに感謝したい。それは日本国内外でHRを認知された職業へと高めていく、まさしくその第一歩と言えるものである。

事実と数字はHRにおいてさえ、ものを言う。HRが、感情、破たんした仮説、文化的惰性ではなく、事実と数字に基礎を置くとき、HRはビジネスで真に重要で、より良い人に関する意思決定ができるようになるのだ。ジャック・ウェルチ氏がかつて言ったように結局のところ「ビジネスは人」なのだから。

Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Search By Tags
Follow Us
  • Facebook Classic
  • Twitter Classic
  • Google Classic

Disclosures & Disclaimers

 

The HR Central K.K. logo and its associated service logos and slogans are registered trade/service marks and properties of HR Central K.K.

Harrison Assessments Logo is owned by Harrison Assessments Int'l. Ltd and used here with permission.

The HR Agenda and JHRS logos are registered trademarks and properties of The Japan HR Society (JHRS) and used here with permission.

All other contents and materials © 2008 onwards by HR Central K.K. All rights reserved.

 

Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | ECO TIP: Please consider the environment before printing this page.
 

Connectwith HRCKK

  • Wix Facebook page
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Twitter Classic